Spearfishermen also reporting above average sized couta right now

Spearos also reporting outsized king mackeral Jason Heyne checks in and also reports that the king mackeral they have been encountering underwater are all way above average. And more exciting news is that the Garrick have turned up in KZN waters in reasonable numbers – Xona The diving conditions this week have been average. Garrick…

via Spearos also reporting outsized king mackeral — thesardine.co.za

The ladies after the Big Blue Vilankulos Sailfish trophy this year

Sailfish ladies eye the trophy at the Vilankulos Sailfish 2017 And it’s all on as the Sailfish ladies eye the trophy at the Big Blue Vilankulos Sailfish 2017. And they are fishing for a good cause…Check this link out and get involved… https://www.generosity.com/education-fundraising/fishing-for-pre-school-education-in-mozambique The sailfish have pitched up exactly on time off Bazaruto and it looks…

via Sailfish ladies eye the trophy at the Vilankulos Sailfish 2017 — thesardine.co.za

Excellent fishing for big Couta right now

 Excellent fishing for big Couta right now

There is  Excellent fishing for big Couta right now, going on up and down the Eastern Seaboard of Southern Africa.

It’s just a matter of finding the right live bait – a small bonito, big shad, big mackerel, and attaching it to a live bait trace – and you are in with a fat chance.

Dead baits can also be fished well for big couta, again using a Mydo Baitswimmer. A long flashy walla walla (ribbon fish) or silky (wolf herring) tied to a Mydo with some 5X #1 trebles is almost a guarantee.

And with the May sailfish run starting up – don’t be surprised to find yourself connected to a crazy wild saily with those baits out the back! Or a late stripey!

To get out to sea and get your own croc couta, contact us for different options in different areas. From Bazaruto to Mazeppa, we can get you out there.

Contact us here.

Sardine Season coming soon

Sardine Season coming soon

With the Sardine Season coming soon, here is a cool video montage of what can be expected if you join Offshore Africa down in Port St Johns, hunting sardines.

It’s a dive operation that takes guests out into the waters off Port St. Johns during the sardine run each year. The sardines often don’t make it as far as Natal some years, but down in these southern waters, the action is monumental. Sharks and other marine animalia come from far and wide to get a taste of the yearly crop. The fishing is berserk crazy, with tuna marauding the outside and mackeral (kings and queens) on the backline.

It’s definitely a great time to fish for kob and garrick too. Especially down in the Transkei, where the water cleans up for winter and the gamefish come right into the estuaries to spawn.

For more information about the sardine run and how to immerse yourself right in it…click on over to…

http://offshoreportstjohns.com

or check The Sardine News out.

New Igfa Rules are way cool

New Igfa Rules are way cool

The New Igfa Rules are way cool! A really sensible and long overdue modernisation…

Firstly, you can tie your top line to your backing!!!

Take a moment, let that sink in. And here’s the punchline…you are only required to have five, yes 5, metres of top line! What a revolutionary change.

The benefits are endless, but firstly, if you break off on a fish, the fish can only be stuck with 5 metres of line. As opposed hundreds of metres sometimes. Which slows and kills the fish anyway. Another may eat that and then he has the line to deal with. Nylon loose in the water is deadly for marine life. Second, you can buy one spool of high quality IGFA line and use it for the whole season! And you can change line classes in literally one minute!

The second rule that stoked me out, was the amendment that nowadays you can hold on to your mate in rough seas, to keep him from falling off the boat or getting injured, whilst he is tussling with a fish. You may not assist in fighting the fish. You may assist the angler from getting in harms way.

You can read more on The Sardine News or IGFA